Intelligent Systems And Their Societies Walter Fritz

 

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Human Societies

 

Here you will read about how important our human society is for our well-being. Then we make a start in changing this science from an imprecise soft science into a hard one. Further we review some mayor problems of today's society like unemployment and war and finally we propose some improvements of the present type of government, when based on the individual as an intelligent system.

 

The importance of societies
There are two reasons why our society is so important to us. Previous generations of members of our society have built it up, its houses, factories and stores. We are born into a society that already has all this built for our use. Furthermore, very many previous generations have accumulated knowledge about or environment and this knowledge is available for our use.
Here you find this explained: The importance of societies (Enter for continuous reading, like a book).

 

Geometry and Society
In geometry certain things and relationships between things have been defined, and based on this the mathematical science of geometry was built. Now, we intend to do the same with the human society.
Here we explain this in: Geometry and Society (Enter for continuous reading, like a book).

 

Concept of a society
To begin, we define a society as a system whose members are intelligent systems.
For the definition, see: Concept of a society (Enter for continuous reading, like a book).

 

"A society is a system. . ."
A society is a system and therefore has the properties of a system such as strong internal communications and a limited extension in space and time.
For details see: "A society is a system. . ." (Enter for continuous reading, like a book).

 

"A society is composed of members. . ."
These members are often themselves societies. We call them sub societies. The most important sub society seems to be the governing sub society.
See: "A society is composed of members. . ." (Enter for continuous reading, like a book).

 

"A society is an intelligent system. . ."
And therefore has the properties of the intelligent system, such as an objective, actions and habits.
Here you will find more detail: "A society is an intelligent system. . ." (Enter for continuous reading, like a book).

 

"The members of a society have a limited life span . . ."
That is the reason a society needs a good system for its members to communicate their knowledge to the next generation. Furthermore, the time in the life span of each member is insufficient to know all that is needed in the society, so specialization and a division of labor came about.
See: "The members of a society have a limited life span . . ." (Enter for continuous reading, like a book).

 

Changes in the Human Society
The human society is not static, it changes continuously.
See here for Changes in the Human Society (Enter for continuous reading, like a book).

 

Experimental Sociology
Having well-defined terms, we can use them in mathematical formulas and use these in computer simulations. Now we can do experiments with a society within a computer.
Experimental sociology (Enter for continuous reading, like a book).

 

Economics
Economics describes part of the activity in a human society. Possibly it can benefit from the precise definitions we use in describing a society.
Economics (Enter for continuous reading, like a book).

 

Proposal for Improving Government and Society
The proposal is to start with the individual, the intelligent system with its objectives. The individual is a member of a municipality and should have the right to do as it pleases, as long as this does not interfere with the right of other persons to do as they please.
By a system of discussion groups they elect only persons they know personally to the next higher level and finally to mayor of the municipality. The level of payment for the cost of government is voted and should be by one tax only, payable to the municipality. In this way it will be obvious what the government costs.
For those actions that the member cannot do alone it has the services of the municipality. For those that the municipality cannot do alone, it requests and pays for the services of the next higher level of government. There are many layers of government but all should be similar in organization. This permits the training in the art of government at all levels. Only a person with experience at a lower level can be elected to the next higher one.
A further proposal is to have each member as a stockholder of the municipality and as such it receives a monthly dividend. This will even out somewhat the income and purchasing power of the members.
For details see Proposal for Improving Government and Society (Enter for continuous reading, like a book).

United Nations
Urgent reforms are needed at the United Nations Organization (Enter for continuous reading, like a book).

 

We have established basic concepts in the preceding paragraphs that can be used in a scientific and mathematical study of societies. This study is based on the IS as the member, the basic building block of a society.

When this science has been further developed, it will allow us to make computer simulations of the development of societies. Comparisons of simulations would then show us the effects of proposed changes.

We have to realize, however, that the evolution of societies, just as the evolution of weather, can only be partially predicted. Small changes (in societies, the actions of individual members) can have profound cumulative effects. As proof, review the concepts of "the butterfly effect" and "chaotic attractors" of general systems theory, see "International Society for the Systems Sciences". (Exterior link).

A better understanding of societies and their properties should permit us to create a more efficient organization of political and industrial societies. And a more efficient organization will allow us all to live better.

 

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Last Edited 8 March 2013 / Walter Fritz
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